Posts Tagged With: RECORDS

GENEALOGY WORD OF THE DAY 11/20

word-of-the-day-new

Picture from grandmaideas.com

Researcher ID Card: All researchers using original records at the National Archives or National Archives regional centers must get a researcher ID card. If you just plan to use microfilmed records, you do not need to get an ID card. To get an ID card you will be asked to fill out an application. You should bring photo identification, such as a driver’s license, school identification card, or passport on your first visit to the archives. Researcher ID cards are free of charge and are valid for two years. The ID card must be presented at each visit. (Definition from genealogy.com)

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2017 Worldwide Indexing Event

The results are in from the 2017 Worldwide Indexing Event.

Worldwide Indexing Event 2017

2017 Worldwide Indexing Event

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Research Road Trip: Magnolia Baptist Church

While I was in Georgia my uncle told me my Great Grandfather Dock Waker was a deacon at the Magnolia Baptist Church, now known as the Magnolia Missionary Baptist Church, my grandmother Clittee Christian Walker also played the piano there. I am hoping before I had back on the road to head home I can look at some of the old church records to validate the oral history. I’ll keep you posted, in the meantime checkout this little video I made on my way to visit Magnolia Missionary Baptist Church.

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Vlog #2

I promise these will get better :). The point of this Vlog is to let people know although DNA is great and it will not replace actual research that needs to be done to research your ancestry. I got so caught up with trying to connect with DNA cousins that I stopped actually researching, for me DNA should be an aid to the research I have done.

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Great Grandma Georgiana

42342_1521003238_0758-02760Ancestry.com. Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1963 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

I almost shed a tear last night when I found my great grandmother Georgiana Beck’s death certificate. I said a quick prayer and a few seconds later while searching on ancestry.com  I found her death certificate. I know all the information provided by the informant might not be accurate but I felt like I hit the jackpot. Of course I am left with more questions then answers now but oh my goodness. We don’t know much about my maternal grandmother’s mother and even less about her father so any information is a win to me.

I had no idea Georgiana died in Pennsylvania, I didn’t know the name of her father or she was even married. My grandmother was raised by grandmother Minnie in East Youngstown, Ohio. The information we have on my great grandparents is limited, over the years I have found a city directory  and two census records to place Georgiana in Jefferson County, Alabama and in East Youngstown, Ohio but no information connecting to my grandmother’s father James L. Christian. James L. Christian is the big mystery in our family, we don’t believe he was married to Georgiana and we believe there was a bit of an age difference between the two. Georgiana was about 15 or 16 when she had my grandmother in Jefferson county, Alabama. I was told James worked in the Steel Mills and had another child a daughter named Delores or Lois but I don’t know where he was from or his age. Recently my uncle told me he had heard James had property in Sharon, Pennsylvania, that’s not far from East Youngstown so on my next trip to Youngstown I’ll be visiting Sharon to see what I can find. I also found at 1926 East Youngstown city directory for Georgiana, I now have two more records to add to her file.

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Taking A Glimpse Into The Past With Indexing

I was so excited when the Freedmen’s Bureau Project was announced. There were 1.5 million Freedmen’s Bureau records just waiting to be indexed. I’ll admit I signed up in June and didn’t index a damn record (excuse my French) until last week. I decided to give it a try and I started with the Freedmen’s Bureau Education Records, 1865-1872. On the first few records I just focused on the information they wanted in order to submit my records (batch). I wasn’t really focused on any other information that the document actually contained. As I was indexing the other day I noticed on the Teacher’s Monthly School Report from 1870 how the much was on this document. The report provided information like the total enrollment of students for the month, how many were black, how many were white, how many students could spell and how many were advanced readers there were even questions about regarding the teachers race and how much they had been paid that month. On one report, teacher Sylvester Dillon stated why the thought there was a decline in student attendance, “the cause for the decline in school is giving that this being a busy time with farmers the children are needed to assist.” I don’t know why but I thought that was really cool when I reading his words, I could imagine him writing that note it’s like I was going back in time. I think it’s important for genealogist to index some records not only to assist in the process to make the records searchable but also to understand what information is available to us from these records. For more info on indexing visit https://familysearch.org/indexing/

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