Posts Tagged With: alabama

My Black History Month: Cousin Ernest Hale

February 8th

Super cool to find this 1951 excerpt in The Clayton Record newspaper ands that my third cousin Ernest L. Hale was a teacher in Barbour County, Alabama.

The Clayton Record
17 Aug 1951

Source:

http://www.newspapers.com: The Clayton Record 17 Aug 1951

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My Black History Month: Grandpa Dock Walker

February 7th

On the 11th day of December 1933 my Great Grandpa Dock Walker sold land to the Saints of Bethlehem Temple of Bromley, Alabama. Grandpa Dock was another ancestor who knew the importance of ownership and legacy. Grandpa Dock owned a lot of property throughout Bromley that his family resided on.

Source:

http://www.deltacomputersystems.com/AL/AL05/drlinkquerya.html

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My Black History Month: Grandpa Jerry Burgess

 February 5th

The first record I see my 3x Great Grandpa Jerry Burgess on is the Alabama Voter Registration record. The record was “created in accordance with the federal, post-Civil War Second Reconstruction Act of March 23, 1867. The act required the commanding Union officer in each military district to register all resident male citizens, 21 years and older, to vote after they had taken an oath of loyalty to the United States. The process was to be completed before September 1, 1867. The 1867 voter registration records are significant because this is one of the first government documents to record African American males living in Alabama.”(Archives Alabama) I cannot imagine how Grandpa Jerry might have felt, after not being treated or seen as a HUMAN BEING for most of his life to then go to being counted as a MAN and have his name on a state wide document. I think it is really cool to see my Grandpa Jerry’s name on this document.




Source:
Ancestry.com. Alabama, U.S., Voter Registration, 1867 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

https://archives.alabama.gov/voterreg/search.cfm

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My Black History Month:Uncle Bryant

February 1st

My 2x Great Uncle Bryant Burke was born May 15th about 1883 according to census and draft records to Ellis and Dinah Burke in Camden Wilcox County, Alabama. Uncle Bryant lived in different areas throughout Alabama before making the move to San Francisco, California. He was married a couple times, first to Aline Davis in 1906, next to Riller Spruel in 1918. One interesting fact about Uncle Bryant was his thumb and middle finger amputated on his right hand. There are no known children from Uncle Bryant. While I was in San Francisco a few years ago, I visited home and neighborhood Uncle Bryant once lived in during the 1940, along with his niece Georgia, her husband Nelson and their family. Uncle Bryant died on February 28, 1952 in San Francisco, his body was transported to Baldwin County, Alabama where he was buried.

What interesting fact have you found out about one of your ancestors/relatives?

Sources:

The National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; Record Group Title: Records of the Selective Service System; Record Group Number: 147

“Alabama County Marriages, 1809-1950,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VRV4-C9H : 15 November 2020), Bryant Burke and Aline Davis, 05 Dec 1906; citing Mobile, Alabama, United States, County Probate Courts, Alabama; FHL microfilm 1,550,509.

“Alabama County Marriages, 1809-1950,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VRVH-93K : 15 November 2020), Bryant Burke and Riller Spruel, 19 Nov 1918; citing Mobile, Alabama, United States, County Probate Courts, Alabama; FHL microfilm 1,550,516.

Year: 1900; Census Place: Cahaba, Dallas, Alabama; Page: 15; Enumeration District: 0026; FHL microfilm: 1240013

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Online Database for Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi Property Records

I’ll probably do a more in-depth post, video or even both on property record research using this database, but I just wanted to share with you all one site that has been really helpful for me when searching for property records for my Baldwin County Alabama ancestors and relatives. With Delta Computer Systems (deltacomputersystems.com)  you can search two Louisiana Parishes, 12 Alabama counties, 48 Mississippi counties and two Mississippi cities. I am only focused on Baldwin County right now so I am not sure what information the other areas provide, if there are any fees for accessing records or how far they go back in record search. I know the Baldwin County site goes back until the early 1900s and some of the records on the site are free to search and download.

I find the Baldwin County site is pretty easy to use, I just put in the last name of the person I am searching for in the search box,  in return I get a list of names, type of record, file date and the actual record in a PDF or TIF version. I can narrow down the list of names but I keep it broad so I can browse others in the area with the particular surname I am looking for.

I do not live anywhere close to the state of Alabama so accessing these records would either have to be done in person when I take my research/road trips or by having  someone search for me. Having free access to this site makes it 10 times easier, I know the Baldwin County records are constantly updated so I am sure to check the site at least once a month. If you are doing research in Alabama, Louisiana or Mississippi in these specific counties or cities definitely visit Delta Computer Systems to see what property information you can find for your family over the internet.

 

 

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The Lynching of Reuben Sims

Mr. Reuben Sims is the only documented lynching victim in Baldwin County, Alabama between 1877 to 1950.

Since he was the “only one” I wanted to try to find out a little more about the circumstances surrounding his lynching. Mr. Reuben Sims’ lynching made it in to newspapers across the country.

Below are some articles I found relating to Mr. Reuben Sims’ murder.

reuben simsFri, Apr 29, 1904 – 4 · The Prattville Progress (Prattville, Alabama) · Newspapers.com

 

Fri, May 13, 1904 – Page 2 · The Atmore Record (Atmore, Alabama) · Newspapers.com

 

Sun, Aug 28, 1904 – 15 · The Montgomery Advertiser (Montgomery, Alabama) · Newspapers.com

 

Thu, Nov 3, 1904 – 3 · The Baldwin Times (Bay Minette, Alabama) · Newspapers.com

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Day trip to Montgomery

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Last week I traveled to Georgia to visit some family, since the part of Georgia I was in was under a three hour drive from Montgomery, Alabama. I decided to take a day trip there. I planned to go to Alabama Department of Archives & History, the Legacy Museum, the National Memorial For Peace and Justice and to visit my cousin Frank.

Our first stop was the Legacy Museum  located at 115 Coosa Street.

“The Legacy Museum:  From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration opened to the public on April 26, 2018, in Montgomery, Alabama. The 11,000-square-foot museum is built on the site of a former warehouse where enslaved black people were imprisoned, and is located midway between an historic slave market and the main river dock and train station where tens of thousands of enslaved people were trafficked during the height of the domestic slave trade. Montgomery’s proximity to the fertile Black Belt region, where slave-owners amassed large enslaved populations to work the rich soil, elevated Montgomery’s prominence in domestic trafficking, and by 1860, Montgomery was the capital of the domestic slave trade in Alabama, one of the two largest slave-owning states in America.” (museumandmemorial.eji.org)

I went through a number of emotions while in the museum, I went from sad once I entered, then I begin to get mad half way through viewing the timeline on the wall. Before exiting I was happy that this museum exist, I definitely recommend visiting the Legacy Museum while in Montgomery.

Photo from museumandmemorial.eji.org

 

Next, we went to the National Memorial For Peace and Justice located at 417 Caroline Street. I believe there is free shuttle service from the museum to the memorial, if you feel like driving your car, there is plenty of parking at the memorial (well I went on a Monday and there was plenty of parking for me) you can also walk to the memorial which will take you about 16 minutes.

“The Memorial for Peace and Justice was conceived with the hope of creating a sober, meaningful site where people can gather and reflect on America’s history of racial inequality.  EJI partnered with artists like Kwame Akoto-Bamfo whose sculpture on slavery confronts visitors when they first enter the memorial. EJI then leads visitors on a journey from slavery, through lynching and racial terror, with text, narrative, and monuments to the lynching victims in America. In the center of the site, visitors will encounter a memorial square, built in collaboration with MASS Design Group. The memorial experience continues through the civil rights era made visible with a sculpture by Dana King dedicated to the women who sustained the Montgomery Bus Boycott.  Finally, the memorial journey ends with contemporary issues of police violence and racially biased criminal justice expressed in a final work created by Hank Willis Thomas. The memorial displays writing from Toni Morrison and Elizabeth Alexander, words from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and a reflection space in honor of Ida B. Wells.” (museumandmemorial.eji.org)

It was eerily quiet walking under the steel monuments, it was 95 degrees and I got chills.

 

Below are some of the picture I took while at the memorial.

 

Next stop was Alabama Department of Archives & History located at 624 Washington Ave. It was about 1:30 PM by the time we got to the archives and I planned on getting an hour of research in. To my surprise the research room is closed on Monday’s (I should have checked the hours of operation, rookie mistake) but I did learn the research room will be now be open every Saturday.

 

Our last stop was to visit cousin Frank, we met about five years ago through our cousin Sonny, whom I met via ancestry.com. My great great grandfather and cousin Frank’s grandfather were brothers.

 

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Newspapers.com find

My 2x Great Aunt Rebecca E. Burke Tompkins is featured in this article I found the other day on newspapers.com I felt really proud and happy when I found this article, I could only imagine how she felt or the rest of our family felt.

 

If you are not utilizing newspapers in your research you should really think twice about it because you can really find some gems and get a better look into your relatives lives.

 

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02 Sept. 1909

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 An Honest Man’s the Noblest Work of God. Pt. 1

Duffie Headstone_Findagrave

Photo taken by Monika Cantrell (for findagrave.com)

My Great Uncle Duffie was only 25 years old when he died, the circumstances of Uncle Duffie’s death was sort of a mystery to me for many years. I knew he had been shot but didn’t know by whom or for what. I’ve heard family stories of a family member being behind his death but I didn’t and at this point I still don’t have any real proof that family member had anything to do with his murder.

While at RootsTech 2018 I stopped by the Genealogybank.com exhibit booth and was able to search on their computers and during my search I came across an article in The Macon Daily Telegraph Newspapers from 01 Jul 1923 about Uncle Duffie’s death. This was the first time I had seen anything regarding his murder. The article was a little difficult to read due to a fold in the paper. I contacted Washington Memorial Library in Macon, GA which houses The Macon Daily Telegraph archives but they had the same folded copy I had. I did some more searching this time using Newspapers.com. I   had to played around with keyword before I found another article in The Montgomery Advertiser also dated 01 Jul 1923. The article is almost identical to the one I found in The Macon Daily Telegraph. 

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Clipping from The Montgomery Advertiser Sunday, July 1, 1923 via Newspapers.com

 

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Clipping from The Montgomery Advertiser Sunday, July 1, 1923 via Newspapers.com

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Clipping from The Montgomery Advertiser Sunday, July 1, 1923 via Newspapers.com

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Clipping from The Montgomery Advertiser Sunday, July 1, 1923 via Newspapers.com

 

 I intend to continue the search for more information regarding Uncle Duffie’s murder.

 

 

 

 

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Clotilda

 

“Relying on historical records and accounts from old timers, AL.com may have located the long-lost wreck of the Clotilda, the last slave ship to bring human cargo to the United States. What’s left of the ship lies partially buried in mud alongside an island in the lower Mobile-Tensaw Delta, a few miles north of the city of Mobile. The hull is tipped to the port side, which appears almost completely buried in mud. The entire length of the starboard side, however, is almost fully exposed. The wreck, which is normally underwater, was exposed during extreme low tides brought on by the same weather system that brought the “Bomb Cyclone” to the Eastern Seaboard. Low tide around Mobile was about two and a half feet below normal thanks to north winds that blew for days.” For more on this discovery visit (al.com)

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